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 A Doll's House-Act 3-Part 2

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Mohamed LAHRI
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Posts : 125
Join date : 2009-07-27
Age : 30
Location : Zaida-Morocco

PostSubject: A Doll's House-Act 3-Part 2   Mon Aug 03, 2009 10:11 pm

MRS. LINDE:
[listening]. Hush! The Tarantella! Go, go!

KROGSTAD:
Why? What is it?

MRS. LINDE:
Do you hear them up there? When that is over, we may expect them back.

KROGSTAD:
Yes, yes—I will go. But it is all no use. Of course you are not aware what steps I have taken in the matter of the Helmers.

MRS. LINDE:
Yes, I know all about that.

KROGSTAD:
And in spite of that have you the courage to—?

MRS. LINDE:
I understand very well to what lengths a man like you might be driven by despair.

KROGSTAD:
If I could only undo what I have done!

MRS. LINDE:
You cannot. Your letter is lying in the letter-box now.

KROGSTAD:
Are you sure of that?

MRS. LINDE:
Quite sure, but—

KROGSTAD:
[with a searching look at her]. Is that what it all means?—that you want to save your friend at any cost? Tell me frankly. Is that it?

MRS. LINDE:
Nils, a woman who has once sold herself for another's sake, doesn't do it a second time.

KROGSTAD:
I will ask for my letter back.

MRS. LINDE:
No, no.

KROGSTAD:
Yes, of course I will. I will wait here till Helmer comes; I will tell him he must give me my letter back—that it only concerns my dismissal—that he is not to read it—

MRS. LINDE:
No, Nils, you must not recall your letter.

KROGSTAD:
But, tell me, wasn't it for that very purpose that you asked me to meet you here?

MRS. LINDE:
In my first moment of fright, it was. But twenty-four hours have elapsed since then, and in that time I have witnessed incredible things in this house. Helmer must know all about it. This unhappy secret must be disclosed; they must have a complete understanding between them, which is impossible with all this concealment and falsehood going on.

KROGSTAD:
Very well, if you will take the responsibility. But there is one thing I can do in any case, and I shall do it at once.

MRS. LINDE:
[listening]. You must be quick and go! The dance is over; we are not safe a moment longer.

KROGSTAD:
I will wait for you below.

MRS. LINDE:
Yes, do. You must see me back to my door.

KROGSTAD:
I have never had such an amazing piece of good fortune in my life! [Goes out through the outer door. The door between the room and the hall remains open.]

MRS. LINDE:
[tidying up the room and laying her hat and cloak ready]. What a difference! what a difference! Someone to work for and live for—a home to bring comfort into. That I will do, indeed. I wish they would be quick and come—[Listens.] Ah, there they are now. I must put on my things. [Takes up her hat and cloak. Helmer's and NORA's voices are heard outside; a key is turned, and Helmer brings NORA almost by force into the hall. She is in an Italian costume with a large black shawl around her; he is in evening dress, and a black domino which is flying open.]

NORA:
[hanging back in the doorway, and struggling with him]. No, no, no!— don't take me in. I want to go upstairs again; I don't want to leave so early.

HELMER:
But, my dearest Nora—

NORA:
Please, Torvald dear—please, please—only an hour more.

HELMER:
Not a single minute, my sweet Nora. You know that was our agreement. Come along into the room; you are catching cold standing there. [He brings her gently into the room, in spite of her resistance.]

MRS. LINDE:
Good-evening.

NORA:
Christine!

HELMER:
You here, so late, Mrs. Linde?

MRS. LINDE:
Yes, you must excuse me; I was so anxious to see Nora in her dress.

NORA:
Have you been sitting here waiting for me?

MRS. LINDE:
Yes, unfortunately I came too late, you had already gone upstairs; and I thought I couldn't go away again without having seen you.

HELMER:
[taking off NORA's shawl]. Yes, take a good look at her. I think she is worth looking at. Isn't she charming, Mrs. Linde?

MRS. LINDE:
Yes, indeed she is.

HELMER:
Doesn't she look remarkably pretty? Everyone thought so at the dance. But she is terribly self-willed, this sweet little person. What are we to do with her? You will hardly believe that I had almost to bring her away by force.

NORA:
Torvald, you will repent not having let me stay, even if it were only for half an hour.

HELMER:
Listen to her, Mrs. Linde! She had danced her Tarantella, and it had been a tremendous success, as it deserved—although possibly the performance was a trifle too realistic—a little more so, I mean, than was strictly compatible with the limitations of art. But never mind about that! The chief thing is, she had made a success—she had made a tremendous success. Do you think I was going to let her remain there after that, and spoil the effect? No, indeed! I took my charming little Capri maiden—my capricious little Capri maiden, I should say—on my arm; took one quick turn round the room; a curtsey on either side, and, as they say in novels, the beautiful apparition disappeared. An exit ought always to be effective, Mrs. Linde; but that is what I cannot make Nora understand. Pooh! this room is hot. [Throws his domino on a chair, and opens the door of his room.] Hullo! it's all dark in here. Oh, of course— excuse me—. [He goes in, and lights some candles.]

NORA:
[in a hurried and breathless whisper]. Well?

MRS. LINDE:
[in a low voice]. I have had a talk with him.

NORA:
Yes, and—

MRS. LINDE:
Nora, you must tell your husband all about it.

NORA:
[in an expressionless voice]. I knew it.

MRS. LINDE:
You have nothing to be afraid of as far as Krogstad is concerned; but you must tell him.

NORA:
I won't tell him.

MRS. LINDE:
Then the letter will.

NORA:
Thank you, Christine. Now I know what I must do. Hush—!

HELMER:
[coming in again]. Well, Mrs. Linde, have you admired her?
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A Doll's House-Act 3-Part 2
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