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 A Doll's House-Act 3-Part 6

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Mohamed LAHRI
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Posts : 125
Join date : 2009-07-27
Age : 30
Location : Zaida-Morocco

PostSubject: A Doll's House-Act 3-Part 6   Mon Aug 03, 2009 10:16 pm

NORA:
Thank you for your forgiveness. [She goes out through the door to the right.]

HELMER:
No, don't go—. [Looks in.] What are you doing in there?

NORA:
[from within]. Taking off my fancy dress.

HELMER:
[standing at the open door]. Yes, do. Try and calm yourself, and make your mind easy again, my frightened little singing-bird. Be at rest, and feel secure; I have broad wings to shelter you under. [Walks up and down by the door.] How warm and cosy our home is, Nora. Here is shelter for you; here I will protect you like a hunted dove that I have saved from a hawk's claws; I will bring peace to your poor beating heart. It will come, little by little, Nora, believe me. To-morrow morning you will look upon it all quite differently; soon everything will be just as it was before. Very soon you won't need me to assure you that I have forgiven you; you will yourself feel the certainty that I have done so. Can you suppose I should ever think of such a thing as repudiating you, or even reproaching you? You have no idea what a true man's heart is like, Nora. There is something so indescribably sweet and satisfying, to a man, in the knowledge that he has forgiven his wife—forgiven her freely, and with all his heart. It seems as if that had made her, as it were, doubly his own; he has given her a new life, so to speak; and she has in a way become both wife and child to him. So you shall be for me after this, my little scared, helpless darling. Have no anxiety about anything, Nora; only be frank and open with me, and I will serve as will and conscience both to you—. What is this? Not gone to bed? Have you changed your things?

NORA:
[in everyday dress]. Yes, Torvald, I have changed my things now.

HELMER:
But what for?—so late as this.

NORA:
I shall not sleep to-night.

HELMER:
But, my dear Nora—

NORA:
[looking at her watch]. It is not so very late. Sit down here, Torvald. You and I have much to say to one another. [She sits down at one side of the table.]

HELMER:
Nora—what is this?—this cold, set face?

NORA:
Sit down. It will take some time; I have a lot to talk over with you.

HELMER:
[sits down at the opposite side of the table]. You alarm me, Nora!— and I don't understand you.

NORA:
No, that is just it. You don't understand me, and I have never understood you either—before to-night. No, you mustn't interrupt me. You must simply listen to what I say. Torvald, this is a settling of accounts.

HELMER:
What do you mean by that?

NORA:
[after a short silence]. Isn't there one thing that strikes you as strange in our sitting here like this?

HELMER:
What is that?

NORA:
We have been married now eight years. Does it not occur to you that this is the first time we two, you and I, husband and wife, have had a serious conversation?

HELMER:
What do you mean by serious?

NORA:
In all these eight years—longer than that—from the very beginning of our acquaintance, we have never exchanged a word on any serious subject.

HELMER:
Was it likely that I would be continually and for ever telling you about worries that you could not help me to bear?

NORA:
I am not speaking about business matters. I say that we have never sat down in earnest together to try and get at the bottom of anything.

HELMER:
But, dearest Nora, would it have been any good to you?

NORA:
That is just it; you have never understood me. I have been greatly wronged, Torvald—first by papa and then by you.

HELMER:
What! By us two—by us two, who have loved you better than anyone else in the world?

NORA:
[shaking her head]. You have never loved me. You have only thought it pleasant to be in love with me.

HELMER:
Nora, what do I hear you saying?

NORA:
It is perfectly true, Torvald. When I was at home with papa, he told me his opinion about everything, and so I had the same opinions; and if I differed from him I concealed the fact, because he would not have liked it. He called me his doll-child, and he played with me just as I used to play with my dolls. And when I came to live with you—

HELMER:
What sort of an expression is that to use about our marriage?

NORA:
[undisturbed]. I mean that I was simply transferred from papa's hands into yours. You arranged everything according to your own taste, and so I got the same tastes as you—or else I pretended to, I am really not quite sure which—I think sometimes the one and sometimes the other. When I look back on it, it seems to me as if I had been living here like a poor woman—just from hand to mouth. I have existed merely to perform tricks for you, Torvald. But you would have it so. You and papa have committed a great sin against me. It is your fault that I have made nothing of my life.

HELMER:
How unreasonable and how ungrateful you are, Nora! Have you not been happy here?

NORA:
No, I have never been happy. I thought I was, but it has never really been so.

HELMER:
Not—not happy!

NORA:
No, only merry. And you have always been so kind to me. But our home has been nothing but a playroom. I have been your doll-wife, just as at home I was papa's doll-child; and here the children have been my dolls. I thought it great fun when you played with me, just as they thought it great fun when I played with them. That is what our marriage has been, Torvald.

HELMER:
There is some truth in what you say—exaggerated and strained as your view of it is. But for the future it shall be different. Playtime shall be over, and lesson-time shall begin.
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A Doll's House-Act 3-Part 6
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