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 A Doll's House-Act 3-Part 7

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Mohamed LAHRI
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Posts : 125
Join date : 2009-07-27
Age : 30
Location : Zaida-Morocco

PostSubject: A Doll's House-Act 3-Part 7   Mon Aug 03, 2009 10:17 pm

NORA:
Whose lessons? Mine, or the children's?

HELMER:
Both yours and the children's, my darling Nora.

NORA:
Alas, Torvald, you are not the man to educate me into being a proper wife for you.

HELMER:
And you can say that!

NORA:
And I—how am I fitted to bring up the children?

HELMER:
Nora!

NORA:
Didn't you say so yourself a little while ago—that you dare not trust me to bring them up?

HELMER:
In a moment of anger! Why do you pay any heed to that?

NORA:
Indeed, you were perfectly right. I am not fit for the task. There is another task I must undertake first. I must try and educate myself—you are not the man to help me in that. I must do that for myself. And that is why I am going to leave you now.

HELMER:
[springing up]. What do you say?

NORA:
I must stand quite alone, if I am to understand myself and everything about me. It is for that reason that I cannot remain with you any longer.

HELMER:
Nora, Nora!

NORA:
I am going away from here now, at once. I am sure Christine will take me in for the night—

HELMER:
You are out of your mind! I won't allow it! I forbid you!

NORA:
It is no use forbidding me anything any longer. I will take with me what belongs to myself. I will take nothing from you, either now or later.

HELMER:
What sort of madness is this!

NORA:
To-morrow I shall go home—I mean, to my old home. It will be easiest for me to find something to do there.

HELMER:
You blind, foolish woman!

NORA:
I must try and get some sense, Torvald.

HELMER:
To desert your home, your husband and your children! And you don't consider what people will say!

NORA:
I cannot consider that at all. I only know that it is necessary for me.

HELMER:
It's shocking. This is how you would neglect your most sacred duties.

NORA:
What do you consider my most sacred duties?

HELMER:
Do I need to tell you that? Are they not your duties to your husband and your children?

NORA:
I have other duties just as sacred.

HELMER:
That you have not. What duties could those be?

Nora. Duties to myself.

HELMER:
Before all else, you are a wife and a mother.

NORA:
I don't believe that any longer. I believe that before all else I am a reasonable human being, just as you are—or, at all events, that I must try and become one. I know quite well, Torvald, that most people would think you right, and that views of that kind are to be found in books; but I can no longer content myself with what most people say, or with what is found in books. I must think over things for myself and get to understand them.

HELMER:
Can you not understand your place in your own home? Have you not a reliable guide in such matters as that?—have you no religion?

NORA:
I am afraid, Torvald, I do not exactly know what religion is.

HELMER:
What are you saying?

NORA:
I know nothing but what the clergyman said, when I went to be confirmed. He told us that religion was this, and that, and the other. When I am away from all this, and am alone, I will look into that matter too. I will see if what the clergyman said is true, or at all events if it is true for me.

HELMER:
This is unheard of in a girl of your age! But if religion cannot lead you aright, let me try and awaken your conscience. I suppose you have some moral sense? Or—answer me—am I to think you have none?

NORA:
I assure you, Torvald, that is not an easy question to answer. I really don't know. The thing perplexes me altogether. I only know that you and I look at it in quite a different light. I am learning, too, that the law is quite another thing from what I supposed; but I find it impossible to convince myself that the law is right. According to it a woman has no right to spare her old dying father, or to save her husband's life. I can't believe that.

HELMER:
You talk like a child. You don't understand the conditions of the world in which you live.

NORA:
No, I don't. But now I am going to try. I am going to see if I can make out who is right, the world or I.

HELMER:
You are ill, Nora; you are delirious; I almost think you are out of your mind.

NORA:
I have never felt my mind so clear and certain as to-night.

HELMER:
And is it with a clear and certain mind that you forsake your husband and your children?

NORA:
Yes, it is.

HELMER:
Then there is only one possible explanation.

NORA:
What is that?

HELMER:
You do not love me anymore.

NORA:
No, that is just it.

HELMER:
Nora!—and you can say that?

NORA:
It gives me great pain, Torvald, for you have always been so kind to me, but I cannot help it. I do not love you any more.

HELMER:
[regaining his composure]. Is that a clear and certain conviction too?

NORA:
Yes, absolutely clear and certain. That is the reason why I will not stay here any longer.

HELMER:
And can you tell me what I have done to forfeit your love?

NORA:
Yes, indeed I can. It was to-night, when the wonderful thing did not happen; then I saw you were not the man I had thought you were.

HELMER:
Explain yourself better. I don't understand you.

NORA:
I have waited so patiently for eight years; for, goodness knows, I knew very well that wonderful things don't happen every day. Then this horrible misfortune came upon me; and then I felt quite certain that the wonderful thing was going to happen at last. When Krogstad's letter was lying out there, never for a moment did I imagine that you would consent to accept this man's conditions. I was so absolutely certain that you would say to him: Publish the thing to the whole world. And when that was done—

a clear certainty
to give up or lose as punishment
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A Doll's House-Act 3-Part 7
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